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politics happens the morning after the morning after. so, i think -- hearing talking about the election. i don't know how the election is going to come up and make no predictions but i do ask myself if romney gets smashed i don't think the political problem is we have a center left problem and we have a far right party that is a structural problem. the republican party has gone nuts in my view. they've been at war -- there's been a simultaneous -- they've been simultaneously at war with physics at the same time. on the deficit and biological l2 mac, some of them for sure. so the question to me is what happens the morning after this election if romney loses. he wasn't far right enough. i wonder if the morning after the morning after. people would say we have gone too far to the right and we need a different republican party which i think the country desperately needs because it needs to be center-left and it's the only way we agree to get big compromises on these issues. >> can i add the role of history suggests the clinton and ronald reagan the second term as the productive term, the big a
in the next legislative session which is right around the corner. we know we have an election in just a few weeks and a lame-duck session and then we will be returning for the 113th congress so i appreciate you being here and i appreciate everybody being here for your session in washington and with that, this hearing is adjourned. [applause] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> we take you live now to georgetown university where we are waiting for discussion to get underway on the future of american democracy. while we wait for this event, here are some comments from first-time voters reacting to last night's presidential debate. the this from "washington journal." [inaudible conversations] >> host: first-time voters only, henry and greensboro north carolina, henry tell us your story. why are you a first-time voter quest. >> caller: i have always felt politics was politics but now when you say the 47%, what night you care about everybody in the next night 47%. i don't like a flip-flopper and to me it just sounds like a flip-flopper. and i don't understand. he wants to put
. the first thing is we were in the middle of an election campaign, and candidate bill clinton was comparing beijing to baghdad. and this was right at the time when china was moving from baghdad to paris. maybe i'm overstating the case a little bit, but that's essentially what was happening. i mean, this was a dramatic shift in china, and the u.s. government paid absolutely no attention to it. it had no impact on the policies of the clinton administration when it took office. and, of course, since i was the american ambassador to china this confronted me with problems with an american government that had one view of china, that china was already moving in a different direction, and that created some contradictions in trying to carry out my instructions faithfully. but i think this time, you have something that goes of that. clearly are the bush eli a fair has exposed that china's political system is not different from others. leaders struggle for power. they have their own ambitions. some succeed, some come crashing down, as in the case of bush eli. so we shouldn't assume that just because c
come back and you know, fred's points are well taken which is for a lot of voters, the election started last night. if he is going to have a come back in ohio, it started last night. >> and fred and then we are going to open it up for the rest of you folks -- president obama one last time and beat senator mccain by seven points. now, part of it was you know, 66% of the vote among 18 to 29-year-olds, 67% of the vote among latino voters. african-american was like 95-4 or something like that and the poll has shown the african-american vote is rocksolid for the president and the numbers extremely high so lets let's just sort of assume rough parity with last time. but the question was, as you suggested the turnout levels among latino voters and i would add young voters very much questionable and when i have gone on campuses i cannot find a pulse. you saw a registration table registered to voters. there might be a couple of people behind the table to register people and nobody in front of the table registering. there's there is just no pulse there. is it safe to say that a seven-point
that separation? another question that's obvious to raise, especially with an election coming up, is in this any way to cover an election? it's a really good question, and i'm sure the session will spark good conversations, and i hope it will give us some good ideas as well. this looks like a fascinating program, and we're very, very proud to host it. thank you very much and welcome. [applause] >> thank you very much. and now i'd like to hand the floor over to jim corpsville of stony brook university who will lead our plenary panel asking, is this any way to cover an election? >> thank you, a.j., and good morning to everybody. we have a very distinguished and knowledgeable panel to talk about this topic, the timing, obviously, couldn't be better, debates wednesday night. let me introduce the people on the panel. to my immediate right is michael howe who's the technical cofounder of the fourth of state project as well as the architect of the platform that runs both enterprises. the project focuses on driving media coverage of the election 2012. and i think he'll have a very interesting powerpoint
. >> the important discussion today. >> many of you know that jon huntsman was elected governor of utah in 2004, when he compiled a very distinguished record. he oversaw major tax and health care reform and also major improvements in public education. following his service as governor he was appointed by president obama as the ambassador to china in 2009. he left that position to run for president and gained tremendous respect for his forthright discussion of important policy challenges. this fall, governor huntsman actually joined the brookings institution as a distinguished fellow, so we are pleased to call in our colleague. bart gordon is a practicing attorney and partner at k&l gates and also a distinguished fellow at the council on competitiveness. bard is a former u.s. representative from the state of tennessee. he served in congress for 26 years from 2007-2010 he served as chairman of the house committee on science and technology. bard is working with the brookings institution to improve public sector leadership as part of our new initiative on improving leadership and management. bill kristol
referendum, upon which parliamentary elections were held which were open to multiple political parties, and now i tell you that syria is continuing to work with the patriotic elements in the opposition to build a new and pluralistic syria that meets the aspirations of its people. syria, at the same time, is determined to carry out its duties and to protect its people from jihadists and takfiri terrorism, which armed terrorist groups are using to spread chaos and create sedition among syrians and threaten their peaceful coexistence. mr. president, we heard from this podium, and on other platforms, some calls that were made by those who are ignorant of the fact or maybe ignoring them, or maybe contributing to their spread, calling on the president of the syrian arab republic to step down. this is blatant interference in the domestic affairs of syria, and the unity of its people and its sovereignty. the syrian people and only the syrian people are authorized to choose their own future and the form of their state, which accommodates all groups throughout the entire spectrum of the syrian p
romney had in mind when he wanted to say states have rights. what about the city's rights to elect their own elected officials? and help do they own? when you say government interference, i understand you were talking about the federal government, but i heard mitt romney say that states' rights, is it the rights of the state's coming into the cities to overthrow the local municipalities? if that's a big government, small government, i don't know, is it controlled government? i think they have a right to control their own destiny in their own city. so the public is on the ballot in november, and i am turning everybody in michigan to vote down. we don't need dictatorship. it is a dictated view. >> host: thanks so much on the mall of the government in relation to the city and its relationship with federal government. and detroit. swb writes the government should do its job and maintain the general welfare. from debate news the numbers are in on how many people watched on television. more than 600 million watched the debate in this election cycle nearly 15 million were going to watch t
, nonliberal, not conservatives. the challenges facing their last election, a challenge from the raid. it does affect how you can behave in the senate to some degree. and we have seen that with both parties. so it seems to be getting worse and harder other than people making it easier. >> let me just make two points. one is let's not forget that 2009 and 2010, the democrats had majorities in both houses of congress. they were vetoproof purity of that stimulus package, obama cared, dodd-frank, the institution of the united states are too big -- are not too big to fail. so they had two years and they had majority for two years and they ran things through with all due respect. we were never consulted about obama cared. we were never consulted about the stimulus. we were never consulted about dodd-frank. we all have to work together between 2009 and 2010. amendment 2010 elections were rejected and if we hadn't had candidates in three swing states, we probably would've been the majority in the united states senate. when i look at all the polarization to work with me for two years. the citizens unit
in the elections of the group of strategists and campaign consultants. this is hosted by the eagleton institute of politics at rutgers university and it is 90 minutes. [inaudible conversations] >> yuriko. technology, technology. hi, good evening. i am with bendel, director of the eagleton institute of politics here at rutgers university and it is my great pleasure to welcome you to this evening special event. this is just one of many exciting events that we planned for this fall and i encourage all of you. i know many of you are in the class and there's many people to pick up the flier outside the room with details about upcoming programs. in particular want to mention that on monday, october 15 will be presenting nbc political director chuck todd at the campus center and there's still time to sign up for that event. and of course for the others. some of you may not realize that you are actually attending a session of a course. the course is called political campaigning. that has been taught at the eagleton institute of policy for more than two decades. it has always been taught by a bipartisan
won't say yeah, we are right even in the best political climate after an election everyone is trying to be nice they can't make progress at the policy is so toxic they are not going to do with the problem. still downgrade. as we have to move past 2013 no matter what. you don't need causing the recession a threat to force us to move. in fact it is irresponsible to have the recession so we should get past the fiscal cliff, extend the ceiling and get to the fundamentals in this grand bargain that will for ever get rid of the fiscal cliff and have a tax code and get rid of the sequestered because we know what the plan will be and that is the best way to go. >> so, the way we got here to the fiscal cliff is a bunch of the cans kept getting kicked down the road and happened to land right in front of us now at the end of december. if you look at cbo office of the fiscal plan if you notice the scary part is the pile of cans that happen to be in front of us right now. there's a good part of the cliff though and that is the part that stretches on throughout the rest of the ten year budget wind
the value of products, $24 billion. and i was elected to congress was 12 billion. ag was 60 billion then, now over 200. we created a tremendous amount of wealth that has been built within the value added ag component of this. let's keep it up and keep taxes low unpredictable and let's have less government regulations and less intrusion in our lives. [applause] moderator: 30 seconds to respond. christie: you know, we have not been able to get much done. my energy policy is making sure that we just create energy positions, short term, long term, medium-term growth for energy, but i just want to make sure that everybody knows that i will be a consistent champion for wind and renewable fuels in this district and congressman king has not been. [applause] moderator: your response, congressman? steve: i happen to be the american wind energy champion designated by the american wind energy association. [applause] i am supported by the renewable fuel and it -- industry across the board so far as i know. we are the number one renewable energy producing congressional district and all of america, the
that puts child care on the map encouraging to get state elected officials and federal elected officials and to the child care centers and they can put a pan on the map. i agree with we have to use more of those techniques in the reauthorization and we have to be more demanding to but i also believe this is a campaign in the congress that is definitely a challenge to get anything constructive said. we have to push more but i would disagree i think there is an interesting activity going on in the state but i think there is a lot of shella activity going on and very serious situations in terms of what is going on for the state funding and early education and in some places where it may look good systemwide it's very precarious, we will be able to maintain in terms of a strong early childhood system. but my final remarks since i was allowed to have the last word is to the business leaders and i would urge all of the business leaders that have increasingly stepped up to support early childhood to also step up to the tax-writing committee and point out all of the tax loopholes we can close an
's unemployed hobos? [laughter] heller: or this is the most difficult part of an election, that's proving something you didn't do or something you didn't say. and in this case, this is something i did not do and something i did not say. i did not say that. what i do want to talk about is i did. i believe there ought to be a federal safety net. i believe that's critically important. it's part of the responsibility this federal government has. for those who have come across hard times, tough times in this economy, especially here in nevada. so under every circumstance i've had a opportunity to vote for the extension of unemployment benefits. the first question that was asked, what have you done to break if your party, i think that's critically important. because i do think the federal government has responsibilities, and one of those is to make sure there's a safety net for people who have had tough times. believe me i've live inside a family that's had tough times. it's not easy. you need to understand that safety net needs to be there to get people back on their feet. diswhrm congresswoma
're having about the policies is that we absolutely need male legislators and male elected officials who prioritize women's health and understand and care about these issues. men like the men we have on this panel tonight. but we need more women in office. [cheers and applause] some of the members of congress are known to say if women are not at the table, we're on the menu. and that needs to change. [laughter] um, so i really do hope that young women in college, in high school who are thinking about their career options, and i many of us -- i know many of us are thinking how do i make a difference in the world, how do i change things for the better, consider going into elected office as an option for how to do that and engaging in this process as a way to have that kind of impact. we've seen unprecedented numbers of pieces of legislation attacking women's access to health care over the last few years, and you can call that a war on whatever you want. i don't want to fight about the terminology. but we've seen those numbers, and one important way to change that is not only to vote based
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15